Darel Snodgrass

Classical Music Host

I began piano lessons at age 6, trumpet at age 9, and began teaching myself the guitar at 10. My electronics knowledge comes from my father, who had the RCA television and stereo shop in my hometown of Pocahontas, Arkansas for nearly 20 years. My dad is still fixing televisions at age 79.

I attended the University of Arkansas at Fayetteville as a music major, and worked weekend shifts at the U of A radio station (my first experience playing classical music on the radio).  I spent a summer playing piano, guitar and bass at the defunct “L'il Abner”- based theme park Dogpatch USA, near Harrison, Arkansas. After a few years playing music professionally, I finished a BS degree in Radio/TV production at Arkansas State University in Jonesboro. 

After another few years playing music in the Ozarks, I moved to Memphis with my wife. I’ve served as Operations Manager of WKNO-FM since 1988, and morning Classical Music host since 1994 – conducting more than 4,500 Checking on the Arts interviews along the way.

Ways to Connect

The Communities in Conversation lecture series continues at Rhodes with Stephanie Elizondo Griest, discussing her new book "All the Angels and Saints: Dispatches from the US Borderlands" on Thursday October 18th at 7 pm in Hardie Auditorium (reception at 6:30).


Dr. Jim Bailey has a vision of a more effectual and proficient health care system, which targets preventive health care issues, but costs much less than what people are currently paying.

As author of The End of Healing: A Journey through the Underworld of American Medicine, he will explain the importance of understanding effective health care and how to demand it as part of the Healthy City Town Hall and Book Signing.

The event, 2-4 p.m. Sunday, July 29, is at the Benjamin L. Hooks Central Library. He'll be joined on a panel by Shantell Leatherwood, chief executive officer for Church Community Health Services, and Scott Morris, founder and CEO of Church Health.

The Memphis Public Library's Explore Memphis started in June and was aimed at keeping children and teens mentally active during their summer break.


Though the Memphis College of Art is now entering its final years of operation (doors close in May of 2020), students are still working on their degrees and, more importantly, making art. 

Now is the time to check out MCA's last biennial student exhibition, which ends this Sunday (July 15) with a celebration and awards ceremony 6-9 p.m. Friday (July 13).

In addition, MCA has created a new donor club, called 1936 Club, organized to help ensure the top educational quality for their current students. 1936 Club was in a response to the school's decrease in funds since the announcement of its closing. 

Both Kristian Rambo, alumni and advancement coordinator, and Bud Richey, VP of student affairs and dean of students, discuss MCA's last exhibit and the 1936 Club.

Justin Fox Burks

In the Summer, I just love to go to outdoor concerts like the ones at Live at the Garden and Levitt Shell.


Darel Snodgrass

A Checking on the Arts road trip, to a unique event.

The Center for Southern Literary Arts will host the inaugural Memphis Literary Arts Festival this Saturday (June 16th), from 9 a.m. to  5 p.m. The festival includes panel discussions around a wide variety of topics, and a street fair. 

Zandria F. Robinson, Alice Faye Duncan, and Jamey Hatley joined us for Checking on the Arts.

 


 

With more than 27 concerts to choose from this year, the Levitt Shell's free music series paves a lot of groove over a small patch of Overton Park grass. Music of all genres and regions, even from Yemen, will be heard beginning May 31st through July 15th. Concerts start at 7:30 p.m. Cindy Cogbill, director of programming and marketing, talks to WKNO about some of the highlights of the summer line-up. So take a listen and mark those calendars! 

 

Once more jumping from the television screen to the pages, WKNO-TV's Behind the Headlines host Eric Barnes has come out with another novel The City Where We Once Lived. The book depicts an abandoned city where people choose to live. It's divided by the north and south end; as the novel unfolds readers learn the history of the city as well as the complicated, dark past of the characters. A prequel, Above the Ether, is set to be released in March 2019.

 

The arts are as essential as English and math, or so the statistics say. Here's one: students in the arts are four times more likely to earn academic honors.

That's why this Saturday (May 12), Shelby County Schools is highlighting over 900 student performers and nearly a thousand pieces of student artwork from more than 150 different Schools.  

Orpheum Theatre Group

 

As the Orpheum Theatre's regular season comes to a close, education programs take center stage. The Orpheum Theatre's Vice President of Education, Jennifer McGrath, stops by WKNO-FM for an interview with Darel Snodgrass. McGrath talks about some of the upcoming summer educational programs for children. In addition, she mentions a professional development program for teachers, in all fields of study, not just the arts, which helps them integrate some form of artistry into their classrooms.  


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