Emily Siner

Emily Siner is an enterprise reporter at WPLN. She has worked at the Los Angeles Times and NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., and her written work was recently published in Slices Of Life, an anthology of literary feature writing. Born and raised in the Chicago area, she is a graduate from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
 

The Tennessee Department of Education has been ordered to respond soon to a lawsuit filed by Measurement Incorporated that seeks $25.7 million in payment from the state.

  

The governor is hearing funding requests from every department in the state this week, and the routine is a familiar one — hit him with the highlights and then ask for money. 

The new chancellor of the University of Tennessee Knoxville laid out a lofty vision for the campus at a ceremony celebrating her new role late Friday.

One of the universities closest to the center of totality will document how animals on campus will react to the sudden darkness of Monday's total solar eclipse.

Researchers from Austin Peay State University's agriculture department will record observations on university cattle, bees and crickets.

School hasn't even started for most students, but state officials want high school seniors to start planning for after graduation.

Starting today, the class of 2018 can apply for Tennessee Promise, the governor's signature education plan allowing high school graduates to attend community or technical college tuition-free. Students have to apply to the program by Nov. 1.

The head of the Tennessee Board of Regents says she plans to change how the leaders of community colleges are evaluated.

Flora Tydings took the helm of the public higher education system about six months ago, amid a rocky period for some higher education administrators. During that time, three college presidents have been publicly criticized by their faculty.

Health insurance companies have officially submitted their premium requests for next year — or how much they plan to charge on the federal marketplace in Tennessee. The numbers would be high, if the state approves them.

But depending on actions at the federal level, it's still possible that rates will not rise by quite as much as proposed. 

A major cut in TennCare enrollment more than a decade ago has been linked to delays in diagnosing breast cancer, according to findings published this week in the journal Cancer

Helping Tennesseans go to college takes more than giving them free tuition: That's one of the takeaways from a report released Monday by Complete Tennessee, a nonprofit that tracks higher education in the state.

The governor is signing the Tennessee Reconnect Grant into law Wednesday — his signature education bill of the year. It guarantees free community college for any adult over the age of 25 or who qualifies as "independent." As a result, colleges are trying to figure out how they can accommodate an influx of adult students.

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