Sergio Martínez-Beltrán

Sergio Martínez-Beltrán is Nashville Public Radio’s political reporter. Prior to moving to Nashville, Sergio covered education for the Standard-Examiner newspaper in Ogden, Utah. He is a Puerto Rico native and his work has also appeared on NPR station WKAR, San Antonio Express-News, Inter News Service, GFR Media and WMIZ 1270 AM.   

In his free time (once in a blue moon), Sergio can be found playing volleyball or in Flamenco Beach in Culebra, Puerto Rico. He is a graduate of Michigan State University and the coolest uncle (feel free to fact-check) to Olivia and Jimena. 

The recent back-to-back mass shootings in Texas and Ohio have prompted a national conversation on gun control laws.

One of the measures being discussed, both nationally and at the state level, are so-called "red flag" laws.

Metro Parks is in the early stages of exploring the process of moving a Confederate monument to another section of Centennial Park.

The board is scheduled discuss the issue at its Aug. 6 meeting.

The open U.S. Senate race in Tennessee just got interesting.

Former Gov. Bill Haslam decided he will not run, opening the door for other Republicans who may have been holding back. And the next day, President Donald Trump tweeted that the U.S. ambassador to Japan, Tennessee's Bill Hagerty, is getting into the race.

When Andrea and Leslie Isham got married in December of last year, they had a pretty unique wedding.

"We literally went into the bar, we paid the cover charge," Leslie Isham says. "We walked through the doors and sat down and just waited for the show."

The "show" was a drag show, the backdrop to the couple's wedding at a gay nightclub in Clarksville, Tenn., alongside friends, drag queens, bartenders — and like-minded strangers.

"We didn't have to worry about protesters showing up, or people being like, 'We don't want that here,' " Andrea Isham says.

President Donald Trump tweeted Friday that Bill Hagerty is entering the U.S. Senate race in Tennessee.

Hagerty is currently the U.S. ambassador to Japan.

The Frayser community in Memphis is dealing with the aftermath of Brandon Webber’s fatal shooting.

The 20-year-old black man was killed by U.S. marshals who were attempting to arrest him on outstanding felony warrants. But it was the violent protest that followed that put the community in the national spotlight.

Later this summer, Tennessee lawmakers will be trying again to find ways to tighten access to abortion in the state.

This comes amid a wave of anti-abortion laws enacted in statehouses across the country. But the goal in Tennessee is to come up with a new approach that would significantly reduce abortions — and could stand up in court.

Tennessee House Speaker Glen Casada, a Republican, said on Tuesday he plans to step down from his position after lewd and racist text messages between him and his former chief of staff were leaked to the media.

Casada's decision comes hours after the House Republican Caucus cast an unprecedented 45-24 no-confidence vote for the speaker.

"When I return to town on June 3, I will meet with caucus leadership to determine the best date for me to resign as speaker," Casada said Tuesday.

Republican lawmakers in the Tennessee House of Representatives will soon decide the fate of Speaker Glen Casada.

The embattled lawmaker has faced backlash after racist and sexist text messages between him and his former chief of staff were leaked to the media.

At least 10 Republican lawmakers in Tennessee have publicly called for a caucus meeting to discuss the fate of House Speaker Glen Casada.

According to GOP Caucus bylaws, that’s the minimum number of lawmakers needed to trigger a special meeting.

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