Emily Siner

Emily Siner is an enterprise reporter at WPLN. She has worked at the Los Angeles Times and NPR headquarters in Washington, D.C., and her written work was recently published in Slices Of Life, an anthology of literary feature writing. Born and raised in the Chicago area, she is a graduate from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.
 

Maria Fonseca found her way to mortuary school the way a lot of people do: Someone died.

"Unfortunately, three years ago, I lost a cousin," she says.

The funeral director who helped her family grieve left an impression. Fonseca didn't know anyone in the funeral industry, and she asked to shadow him. Then she decided to follow in his footsteps.

"I want to be there to support [families] whenever they're going through the worst moment in their life," she says.

A top aide in the Tennessee House resigned Monday evening after a tumultous series of revelations and accusations against him.

Some of the accusations could also implicate his boss, House Speaker Glen Casada.

Throughout this year's campaign, we've been interviewing the candidates for statewide office. This week, we talk to Phil Bredesen, the Democratic nominee for U.S. Senate.

The Republican gubernatorial candidate with the most name recognition is Congressman Diane Black, polls have shown. And if elected, she would be the first woman to hold the position of governor.

But that isn't what she talks about to voters. Instead, she touts close ties to President Trump and fierce opposition to illegal immigration.

WPLN's Emily Siner spoke with Black about what messages she's decided to emphasize in her campaign. And Emily talked through the conversation with her colleague Jason Moon Wilkins.

Democrat Craig Fitzhugh has been a prominent figure in Tennessee politics for more than two decades, but the state has changed around him quite a bit. When he started as a state representative, he was in the majority. Now, he's running for governor in a state that votes overwhelmingly Republican.

A massive room in East Tennessee is now home to the fastest supercomputer in the world. Oak Ridge National Laboratory officially unveiled the machine called Summit late last week, which takes up the size of two tennis courts.

Tennessee lawmakers are starting to wind up business for the year, but there are still several big debates left to resolve.

School security. Medical marijuana. And marriage laws, to name a few.

As the #MeToo movement ricochets through Hollywood and into other industries, Nashville musicians and legislators alike appear to be coming to terms with the country music industry's role in dealing with sexual harassment.

Sewanee, a liberal arts university in Middle Tennessee, has decided it will not revoke an honorary degree it awarded to Charlie Rose in 2016.

The veteran news anchor was accused by several women late last year of making unwanted sexual advances in the workplace, and some students at Sewanee: The University of the South had wanted its governing board to take action.

The Tennessee Department of Education has been ordered to respond soon to a lawsuit filed by Measurement Incorporated that seeks $25.7 million in payment from the state.

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